Palladium Metal
 

Buyers Guide - Palladium Metal

Palladium

Palladium Wedding Rings Since palladium belongs to the family of platinum metals, it shares many of the same properties. Examples of the latter would be; its durability, as well as its hypoallergenic properties. The key difference is the fact that it is significantly softer.

There are two types of palladium jewellery – 500 and 950.
The latter figures simply indicate as to how much palladium is actually present in the item. 500 mean that the item comprises of 50% palladium and the remnant; other alloys. 950 imply that the item contains 95% palladium and 5% other alloys.

Palladium wedding bands and jewellery will be discreetly marked with the relevant number.

Palladium is great for filigree work – allowing for a broad spectrum of designs and the fact that it is sold at more affordable rates, explains why it is commonly used as an alternative to platinum - particularly with regards to wedding and engagement rings

Its natural colour - silvery-white is maintained in perfect state - even as time progresses. The latter is due to the fact that palladium doesn’t react with elements in the air and hence, doesn’t discolour, though overtime it will develop a natural patina on its surface, most find this as attractive as a polished finish.

Like all precious metals, palladium may scratch though it is worthwhile to note that none of the volume is lost, it is merely displaced. Since, palladium is expected to continue in its popularity surge for many years to come, you can rest assured that your purchasing a palladium piece is an investment worthwhile.

In summary, for those on tighter budgets who don’t want to compromise on quality, value and beauty, palladium is the one word answer!

Some aftercare advice: It is advisable to remove palladium rings and jewellery when performing the mundane for obvious protection reasons.